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VOIP Timeshifting

How could a user control a VOIP stream?

Concept

This design exploration asks the question "How could a user control a VOIP stream to handle a phone call most efficiently?"

Inspired by Tivo, we looked at ways that the user could timeshift the conversation to catch parts that he had missed. This could be particularly useful on conference calls where you're not always actively talking or listening.

Implementation

In addition to manually timeshifiting the voice stream, we considered automatic triggers which would initiate a time shift. For instance, if your name is mentioned and there is a period of silence (e.g. someone on the call says "what do you think about that, Eric?) then the application would shift back 15 seconds and play back the conversation at 2x speed to help you catch up.

Controls were also designed to allow the playback stream to be presented "on top of" (louder than) the live stream so that the user could pay attention to both.

The mock-up images where produced in Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator and were later used in an application for patent protection